Posts Categorized:

bartending

Inside the Mind of a Bartender

Five creative insights to shake and stir into the cocktail of your life

Every time we go out to eat or drink, the goal is the same: to have a fun time enjoying something tasty. But sometimes we also want to be wowed, and that can only come from people who not only know their stuff, but are talented and passionate about what they do. How do amazing dishes or drinks come into the world? We’ve all read stories or watched documentaries about chefs and how they create, but we rarely get a chance to hear from the other architects of taste: the bartenders.

Since I became enamoured with food, I also fell in love with cocktails, because there is an ethereal and mysterious quality about a beverage that is not necessarily present in a dish. To mix a variety of liquids that have no relation to one another in order to create a new and defined flavor, is a skill that amazes me. A good bartender needs a sharp palate and an expert nose just like a chef does, and must be precise like a chemist. To understand what makes them tick, I went to the best possible place to observe bartenders: a world cocktail competition.

I’m in Berlin, during the semifinals of Bacardi Legacy global,in an auditorium with 38 of the world’s best bartenders.  I am surrounded by imagination and tattoos. Lots of tattoos.  What makes this contest special is that they are asked not just to create a delicious cocktail, but one that has both the simplicity and the wonderment to become a classic around the world. They also have to build a story around the drink and promote it for months. It’s a long road to get here, and this is their moment of truth.

I watch them backstage practicing, sweating, talking to themselves. When they go on, blasting music and spotlights, it’s their personality, style, and skill that have to make them stand apart. You don’t need to be a cocktail geek to enjoy watching 38 very creative people approach the same challenge in their unique way. Their commitment is inspiring to say the least. What’s going on in their heads? I focused on five people who caught my eye. While trying to get a glimpse inside the mind of a bartender,  I found a few inspiring insights that apply not just to bar life, but could prove useful to our everyday creative challenges.

Kaitlin Wilkes
Corner Club
Stockholm, Sweden

“Let your surroundings (and your rules) inspire you”

Looking at Kaitlin’s Instagram you can tell she’s a fun and outgoing person. But at the competition, she comes across as a cocktail scholar: disciplined, educated, and opinionated. She speaks and prepares her drink with poise and conviction, you believe everything she says. It would be great to know what her creative process is.

“I always try to find inspiration with what’s around me. And that can come from a situation, or a story someone’s told me, or a dish that I had,” Kaitlin says. “You just have to live life and some situations just really catch you.” Once she’s found an idea, and is ready to turn it into a beverage, she looks at her coloring box. “I have to decide what spirit to use, how much of the back-bar, and how much technique”. But it’s also useful to set your own rules and stick to them, such as using five ingredients or less. “I am really adamant about being able to taste everything you are reading (in a menu). Nothing aggravates me more than going to a bar and looking at a cocktail with 18 ingredients when you can only taste four.”


Hideyuki Saito
The Bronx Liquid Parlour
Bangkok, Thailand

“Be daring, but be cautious as well”

Olive oil, egg white, tomato syrup… sounds more like a salad dressing than a cocktail, but those were some of the ingredients in Saito’s drink. Whoah! What is this man thinking? What is this man drinking? “Sometimes I like a simple drink, like a Manhattan or Negroni,” a very proper Saito says. “But you can get that anywhere. For the cocktails that make us unique, I like to use something unusual.”  And unusual it was! I tried the drink and “yummy” is not the word that came to mind, but “amazing” did. The level of balance was astounding. How does anyone come up with something so “out there”? “I like my guests to be surprised,” he says. Saito believes in taking chances, starting with a vision of what one key ingredient might taste like, and build from there.

But he warns me that even when you let imagination go wild, you must not forget about boundaries, because at the end of the day, the drink has to sell. “It’s about operation. It has to replicate pretty easily. It cannot be that complex, Saito explains. “You must balance the operation side with the creative side.”


Loreta Toska
Theory Bar and more
Athens, Greece

“Think like a designer”

I had a lot of laughs and also deep conversations with the Greek contestant, Loreta Toska. I realized she had an ability to gage the moment, which is a sensibility she applies to her bartending inspiration. “The most inspirational thing in the world is a problem. If you don’t have a problem, you’re just bored,” she says.

“Look for the Silver Lining”

This is a thought that I have heard before from designers. They are thinking about the form, but also about the function of their creation. Loreta thinks not only of the taste and look of the drink, but exactly how and when people will drink it. “I wanted to make a drink that could be the first drink of the night. To forget what happened today,” she says of her competition cocktail, a white and fluffy beverage made with rum and vanilla ice cream that is impossible to drink without smiling. She decides in advance what is the feeling she wants to create with each glass. “Had I made something that was dark and bitter, would be about later.in the night. To have a cigar. When we want to make something inspired by a concept, that is designing. Just making a drink is more like cooking.”


Darnell Holguin
Fifty Restaurant
New York City, USA

“Pay attention to your mistakes”

Darnell went on stage with confidence and swagger. His Dominican-inspired passion fruit drink was certainly a big hit, but having a successful cocktail like this one may take a lot of trial and error.

Sometimes we come up with ideas that seem brilliant, but how often are they awesome on the first try?  “I have situations when I like to create an out-of-the-box cocktail. I once tried to create a Piña Colada out of a Negroni,” Darnell says with a chuckle. He sees the confusion on my face as I try to do the math. “It was horrible,” he explains, (which makes sense). He says that his idea felt like a failure, but rather than dropping it altogether, he decided to build on the best parts. “I had created a coconut-infused Campari, so I worked with that.” Little by little, that led to the creation of one of his signature cocktails called “French Colony”.   Darnell taught me that while your original idea may not have been as great as you first thought, your mistakes will light a pathway to perhaps an even greater outcome.


Jorge Landeros
Fifty Mils
Mexico City

“Bond with your creation”

“Unión”

Mexican contestant Jorge Landeros’ performance truly moved the audience. When we chatted, I realized that the passion he poured out was not created for the stage, it was created for his drink. “Your creation must have a part of you, an emotional part,” he says. His drink “Unión” uses ingredients from various countries as a metaphor for bringing people together without borders. “I connected to my family, since many of my cousins left the country searching for the American Dream. I connected to the pain of absence and loss; the family element was essential to me”

What I take from Jorge is that the most successful work involves a relationship between author and creation. “It begins when you’re researching. Going to the market, choosing ingredients. Where that lime comes from, for example, is already building on the story the cocktail tells”   Falling in love with your project makes a lot of sense. After all, when a drink is successful, the bartender will have to make it over and over, just like a musician is expected to play his hit song at every show. “Whenever I make one of those drinks it connects me to where I was in life at the time I came up with it. When people enjoy the drink, they adopt it into their lives. Sometimes they tell me they made it at home, so that means that your cocktail can have a life of its own way beyond you. This is how people remember you. When you help them build memories, you are building a legacy for yourself. “

 

 

Dentro de la Mente de un Bartender

5 tips de creatividad para mezclar al cocktail de tu vida

Cada vez que salimos a comer o beber, el objetivo es el mismo: pasar un rato divertido disfrutando algo sabroso.  Sin embargo, a veces queremos más, que nos sorprendan.  Eso sólo se logra con gente que tiene oficio, pero también talento y pasión.  ¿Cómo llegan a este mundo los platillos o bebidas sorprendentes? Todos hemos leído reportajes o visto documentales sobre los chefs y la forma en que crean. Pero casi nunca tenemos la oportunidad de escuchar de los otros arquitectos del sabor:  los Bartenders.

Desde que me obsesioné con la gastronomía, también me enamoré de la coctelería, porque el trago tiene una cierta cualidad etérea y misteriosa que no está necesariamente presente en un platillo. Mezclar una variedad de líquidos (que no tienen ninguna relación el uno con el otro) para crear un nuevo y definido sabor, es un talento que me asombra.  Un buen bartender necesita un paladar y una nariz afinados como un chef, tiene que ser preciso como un químico. Para entender cómo es que esta gente funciona, fui al mejor lugar posible para observar bartenders: una competencia mundial de coctelería.

Estoy en Berlín, durante la semifinales del concurso Bacardi Legacy, en un auditorio con 38 de los mejores bartenders del planeta.  Estoy rodeado de ingenio y tatuajes.  Muchos tatuajes. Lo que distingue a esta competencia, es que les piden no solamente crear un cóctel delicioso, sino uno que contenga la simplicidad y el nivel de asombro necesarios para convertirse en un clásico a nivel global. También tiene que construir una historia alrededor del trago y promoverlo por meses.  Para ellos ha sido un largo camino para llegar aquí, y este es su momento de la verdad.

Los observo tras bambalinas ensayando, sudando, hablando solos. Cuando entran en escena, con música y luces a todo lo que da, es su personalidad, estilo, y conocimiento lo que necesitan para destacar.  No se necesita ser nerd de coctelería para disfrutar un show con 38 personas muy creativas que afrontan el mismo reto, cada quien a su manera.  Ese compromiso es más que inspirador.  Y pienso ¿qué está sucediendo en sus cabezas? Me enfoque en cinco personas que capturaron mi atención. En un esfuerzo para obtener un vistazo a la mente de un bartender, encontré guías de inspiración que van más allá de los tragos, que tu y yo podemos aplicar a nuestros retos creativos cotidianos:

Kaitlin Wilkes
Corner Club
Estocolmo, Suecia

“Deja que tu entorno (y tus reglas) te inspiren”

Si ves el Instagram de Kaitlin, te das cuenta que ella es una persona divertida y social. Pero en competencia, se presenta como una académica del cóctel: disciplinada, educada, y seria.   Habla y prepara su trago con porte y convicción. Le crees todo lo que dice. Sería genial entender cuál es su proceso creativo.

“Siempre intento encontrar inspiración con lo que me rodea.  Y eso puede venir de alguna situación, o una historia que alguien me ha contado, o un platillo que he disfrutado,” dice. “Tienes que vivir la vida y algunas situaciones simplemente te atrapan.” Ya que ella encuentra una idea, y está lista para convertirla en un trago, ella consulta su caja de herramientas. “Tengo que decidir que destilado voy a usar, que tanto de la barra, y cuanta técnica”. Pero también es útil imponer tus propias reglas y respetarlas, como el usar cinco ingredientes o menos. “Realmente insisto de que hay que poder degustar todo lo que lees (en un menú). Nada me fastidia más que ir a un bar y encontrar un cóctel con 18 ingredientes cuando en realidad sólo puedes distinguir cuatro.”


Hideyuki Saito
The Bronx Liquid Parlour
Bangkok, Tailandia

“Sé audaz, pero cauteloso también”

Aceite de oliva, huevo, jarabe de tomate… Suena más como aderezo de ensalada que un cocktail, pero esos eran algunos de los ingredientes en el trago de Saito. ¿Qué se cree? ¿Qué se toma?  “A veces disfruto un trago sencillo como un Manhattan o un Negroni,” responde un muy serio Saito. “Pero eso lo encuentras en todas partes. Para los cócteles que nos distinguen, me gusta utilizar algo inusual.”  ¡Y vaya que lo es! Probé su trago y “deli” no es la palabra que me vino la mente.  “Increíble”, “fascinante”, y “asombroso” si lo fueron. El nivel de equilibrio fue impactante.  ¿Cómo es que a alguien se le ocurre algo tan loco?  “Me gusta que mis clientes se sorprendan,” él dice.  Él cree en tomar riesgos, comenzar con una visión del sabor de un ingrediente central, y construir a su alrededor.

Pero me advierte que aún cuando sueltas libre la imaginación, no debes olvidar los límites. Porque al final del día, el trago tiene que venderse. “Es un tema de operación. Tiene que replicarse con facilidad. No puede ser demasiado complicado o demasiado exótico,” explica. “Debes equilibrar el lado operativo con el lado creativo”.


Loreta Toska
Theory Bar and more
Athens, Greece

“Piensa como un diseñador”

Disfruté muchas risas y también conversaciones profundas con la competidora de Grecia, Loreta Toska.  Percibí que tiene una habilidad para evaluar el momento y el tono que le corresponde, la cual es una sensibilidad que aplica a su inspiración de barra.  “Lo más inspirador en este mundo es un problema. Si no tienes un problema, simplemente te aburres,” dice ella.

“Look for the Silver Lining”

Éste es un pensamiento que ya he escuchado antes de boca de diseñadores.  Ellos están pensando en la forma, pero también en la función de su creación. Loreta piensa no solamente del sabor y el aspecto de su trago, pero exactamente como y cuando la gente lo beberá.  “Quería hacer una bebida que fuera el primer drink de la noche. Para olvidar lo que sucedió el día de hoy,” dice ella de su cóctel de competencia, un brebaje blanco y espumoso hecho con ron y helado de vainilla que es imposible beber sin una sonrisa en tus labios. Ella decide por adelantado cuál es el sentimiento que ella quiere provocar en cada copa. “Si yo hubiera querido algo más oscuro y amargo, sería para más entrada la noche. Para fumarse un puro. Cuando queremos hacer algo inspirado por un concepto, eso es diseñar. Simplemente hacer un trago es más como cocinar”


Darnell Holguin
Fifty Restaurant
New York City, USA

“Presta atención a tus errores”

Darnell entró a escena con porte y seguridad. Su bebida de maracuyá de inspiración dominicana fue sin duda un gran hit, pero lograr un cocktail exitoso como éste requiere de mucha prueba y error.

A veces concebimos ideas que parecen ser brillantes, pero ¿que tan seguido son chingonas a la primera?  “Hay situaciones en las que deseo crear un cocktail fuera de lo convencional. En una ocasión, intenté crear un Piña Colada partiendo desde un Negroni,” dice el con un poco de risa.  Se da cuenta de la confusión sobre mi cara mientras trato de resolver lo que dijo. “Fue espantoso,” explica (lo cual tiene sentido). Dice que sintió que su idea fue un fracaso, pero en vez de abandonarlo por completo, decidió construir sobre las mejores partes. “Había creado un Campari infusionado con coco, así que trabaje con eso.” Poco a poco lo llevó a la creación de uno de sus cocktails insignia, llamado “French Colony”.  Darnell me enseñó que mientras tu idea original quizás no fue tan buena como pensaste al inicio, tus errores iluminarán el camino hacia otro resultado quizás aún mejor.


Jorge Landeros
Fifty Mils
Ciudad de México

“Vincúlate con tu creación”

“Unión”

La presentación del concursante mexicano Jorge Landeros realmente conmovió al público. Cuando platicamos, me di cuenta que la pasión que derramó no fue creada para el escenario, fue creada para su trago. “Tu creación tiene que llevar una parte de ti, una parte emocional,” dice. Su trago “unión” usa ingredientes de varios países como metáfora para congregar a la gente sin fronteras. “Me inspiré en mi familia, ya que muchos de mis primos dejaron del país en búsqueda del sueño americano. Me conecté con el dolor de la carencia y la ausencia; el elemento familiar era esencial para mí”.

Lo que se me queda de Jorge, es que el trabajo más exitoso involucra una relación entre autor y creación. “Comienza cuando estás investigando. Ir al mercado, elegir ingredientes. De dónde viene ese limón, por ejemplo, ya está construyendo sobre la historia que cuenta el cóctel”.  Enamorarte de tu proyecto hace mucho sentido.  A fin de cuentas, cuando un trago es exitoso, el bartender tendrá que hacerlo una y otra vez, justo como a un músico se le espera que cante su gran éxito en todas las presentaciones. “Siempre que hago uno de esos tragos me conecta con donde yo estaba en mi vida en ese momento que lo desarrollé. Cuando la gente disfruta el trago, lo adoptan en sus vidas. A veces me dicen que los hacen en sus casas, lo cual significa que tu cóctel puede tener su vida propia más allá de ti.  Así es como la gente te recuerda. Cuando los ayudas a construir sus recuerdos, te estás construyendo un legado para ti mismo.”